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Applied Zooarchaeology and Conservation Biology at Nu‘alolo Kai

Applied Zooarchaeology and Conservation Biology at Nu‘alolo Kai

Chapter:
(p.170) Chapter 10 Applied Zooarchaeology and Conservation Biology at Nu‘alolo Kai
Source:
Abundance and Resilience
Author(s):
Alex E. MorrisonKelley S. Esh
Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824839895.003.0010

This chapter discusses the usefulness of applied zooarchaeology to conservation biology and habitat management by present examples drawn from the shellfish and avian assemblages of Nuʻalolo Kai. It first considers a model of applied zooarchaeological research presented by Butler and Delacorte (2004) from the southern Owens Valley, California before analyzing shellfish use and avifauna at Nuʻalolo Kai. The chapter focuses on four species of the genus Cellana, known as the black-foot ʻopihi, yellow-foot ʻopihi, giant ʻopihi, and green-foot ʻopihi. The findings have implications for the general biota of the Hawaiian archipelago and suggest that traditional Hawaiian harvesting practices may have managed stocks well and maintained populations at abundant and healthy levels, even as recoveries in population size and the individual size of adult specimens are also apparent.

Keywords:   applied zooarchaeology, conservation biology, habitat management, shellfish, Nuʻalolo Kai, zooarchaeological research, Owens Valley, avifauna, Cellana, ʻopihi

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